REVIEW

DAILY ECHO
" Full houses at Boscombe’s"
24th August 2018

DAILY ECHO SOUTHERN
"The acting quality is utterly superb"
24th August 2018

SCENE ONEPLUS
" The production, direction and performances are excellent."
24th August 2018

DAILY ECHO
Hi-De-Hi star "loving every minute" in Bournemouth
14th August 2018

SCENE ONEPLUS
"Each of the actors brings out the key features of his or her character in an unfussy, plausibl way"
17th August 18

DANCING LEDGE
"Suddenly at home" is another triumph for director Vernon Thompson and the London Repertory Players.

DAILY ECHO
17th August 2018


DAILY ECHO
"This production had kept the audience gripped"
12th August 2018

SCENE ONEPLUS
Dangerous Corner " The company provides a spirited, engaging production."
10th August 2018

DANCING LEDGE
"Their reading of Priestley's carefully constructed cast of characters is is perfect."
10th August 2018

DAILY ECHO
"Talented London Repertory Players delivered qnother entertaining high-quality production"
6th August 2018

SCENE ONEPLUS
"Murder Game" "Hugely enjoyable production" 3rd August 17


DAILY ECHO
"They are all first rate ... A very exciting thriller"
3rd August 2018

DANCING LEDGE
"The real strength though is in the acting"
3rd August 2018

MEDIUM Summer rep seson back to the coast
18th June 2018

SCENE ONEPLUS
Dangerous obsession
17th August 2017

ECHO
30th June 2018

SOUTHBOURNE EYE
Local history by Hattie Miles
July 2018

DAILY ECHO
"A wonderful theatrical treat"
18th August 2017 ​

SCENE ONEPLUS
DIAL ‘M’ FOR MURDER
3rd August 18

DAILY ECHO
"Traditional theatre back to Bournemouth"
4th August 2016

DORSET MAGAZINE
August 2018

SOUTHERN ECHO REVIEW:
DANGEROUS CORNER,

SHELLEY THEATRE, BOSCOMBE.

Featuring an explosive opening with a loud gunshot and a piercing scream – echoed in the play’s symmetrical ending – this is ingenious and enjoyable work.

Written (in a week!) in 1932 by JB Priestley – the first of his 40-odd plays, it’s ostensibly a typical 1930s drawing-room drama, with seven wealthy, successful, self-satisfied characters enjoying an elegant dinner party.

In upper-class English accents they refer urbanely to “the afternoon post delivery” and apologise smoothly for “dropping bricks”. But as shocking secrets are revealed, tension increases, tempers rise and insults are exchanged: “That was beastly!”, “Don’t be a cad!”, and “You rotten swine!”

Despite occasional over-wordiness – particularly in the first half – this play was considered daring and controversial for the 1930s, exploring marital infidelity, financial business theft, homosexuality and recreational drugs – all still relevant today!

Seven superb London Repertory actors convey a wide range of emotions, unpleasant truths, half-truths, lies, and astounding revelations.

The missing eighth character Martin – who apparently committed suicide (or did he?) – acts as the catalyst for the other characters’ turmoil of emotions: guilt, jealousy, love, lust, and loathing.

Brilliant direction by Vernon Thompson allows this tremendous play to end with a bang, and then seem to start again, allowing the audience to see things afresh…

Dangerous Corner runs until next Tuesday August 14, nightly at 7.30.

Next week a new play starts – Francis Durbridge’s Suddenly at Home – don’t miss it!

Brendan McCusker

SOUTHERN ECHO REVIEW:
SUDDENLY AT HOME,

SHELLEY THEATRE, BOSCOMBE.

Francis Durbridge’s wonderful play Suddenly At Home is running for this week (Thursday-Tuesday August 16-21) at this beautifully atmospheric old Shelley theatre.

Durbridge won international acclaim as the creator of Paul Temple, one of the most famous of all BBC radio detectives. Durbridge also wrote nine stage plays, this one Suddenly At Home first performed in 1971.

Set in a London flat in the 1970s, accomplished and creative director Vernon Thompson ensures that the audience is hooked, intrigued, and completely entertained by this realistic drama.

The stage set is utterly convincing, not in a clichéd 70s way, but with some hugely appropriate furniture – the CD tower (with the sound of Madonna’s Material Girl,) the semi-circular table, and the wall paintings (which can be purchased).

Costumes, wigs and make-up are spot-on, yet it’s the superb acting quality which drives the drama. Mark Spalding is utterly brilliant as the chillingly realistic suffocating murderer Glen Howard, Kirsty Cox is wonderfully accomplished as the mesmeric Helen Tenby, and Hepzibah Roe is astonishingly effective as the unlikely “au pair” girl.

Surprises, shocks, and twists abound in this clever drama, particularly with the two detectives, beautifully conveyed by Neil James and Musa Trevathan.

The talented London Repertory Players conclude their exciting summer season here at the Shelley Theatre next week ( Thursday –Tuesday August 23-28) with Richard Harris’s tense psychological thriller of guilt and obsession … Dead Guilty… don’t miss it!

Brendan McCusker

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Hephzibah Roe trained at the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama where she won the Peter and Alice Bursary. Currently she can be seen in Brenda The Alternative Steward. Other credits include working with Speechless Theatre on their five production of Drawn In and with director Jon James Smith on “Spira”; where she was nominated for Best Actress at the British Horror Film Awards. She is also a writer and film maker and is currently in pre-production of her latest project “Repose”. She is delighted to be a part of London Repertory Players’ play festival this year, having been part of its inaugural season (in Dead of Night) and is looking forward to enjoying the summer back in her home town.

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